Past Courses

January 6, 2020 - January 7, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 8, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

The Neurobiology of Supervision

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

The recent explosion of knowledge emerging from brain science has clearly demonstrated that meaningful learning requires integration of multiple domains of functioning. Meaningful, long-lasting learning requires engagement of body, mind and emotion. Although mental health professionals have begun to embrace holistic and integrative methods for practice, use of experiential methods in supervision has been slower to develop. This workshop will demonstrate how experiential methods can be used to enhance individual and group supervision. Participants will have the opportunity to practice and evaluate experiential techniques for supervision in small groups.

Course objectives include:

  • Increase awareness of the basic brain functions that impact the supervisory relationship
  • Learn skills that support supervisees to begin to articulate the affective, cognitive and body based experience of the helping relationship
  • Practice skills for supporting supervisees to accurately label difficult to quantify experiences in their work with individuals, families and groups

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate


January 9, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and Its Application in Social Work Supervision

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

The supervisory relationship presents some unique challenges and opportunities involving effective use of self. Supervisors are frequently confronted with situations that may evoke strong personal reactions. This course will help participants develop a meaningful and accessible way to conceptualize, apply, and describe the process of “use of self” to themselves and their supervisors.

This course will utilize didactic input and experiential learning, participants will explore how the whole person of the supervisor can be effectively engaged in the way supervision is provided. Strategies for managing obstacles will be introduced, including self-insight, self-integration, empathy, anxiety management, and conceptualizing skills.

Participants in this course will learn (to):

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisees relationships with clients
  • Strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness
  • How the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 10, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections of Culture and Power

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


January 13, 2020 | 8:45:00a.m. to 12:00p.m.

Writing Your Best DA: Staying Ethical, Efficient, and Compliant

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

Writing a Diagnostic Assessment is central to the treatment process and a core component of most clinical social workers’ roles. Despite this, many clinical social workers do not have the opportunity to master this skill, learning primarily on the job with little training or feedback. It is essential that clinical social workers feel that they can engage in this practice in a way that is client-centered, ethical, meets the needs of their agency and third-party payers (especially MN DHS requirements), and is efficient. Diagnostic Assessments live on for clients in their mental health records, court files and outcomes, relationships with service providers, and most importantly affect the ways that they see themselves in the context of their mental health. It is incumbent upon practitioners to ensure that we continue to hone our skills for diagnosis and assessment writing to ensure an ethical process that centers the client’s needs while maintaining compliance with statutory requirements.

Participants in this course will:

  • Learn strategies for client interviews to aid in efficient writing of diagnostic assessments, with a focus on interviewing to assess safely for trauma history.
  • Review MN DHS statutory requirements for writing a Diagnostic Assessment, with special focus on cultural influences.
  • Practice with comprehensive clinical summaries, written to statute, which integrate data obtained in the interview with their clinical justification for the chosen diagnosis and assessment of client needs and referrals.

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


January 13, 2020 | 1:00p.m. to 4:15p.m.

Differential Diagnosis in Trauma: DSM-5 Diagnosis for Traumatized Clients

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

Differential diagnosis for clients presenting with trauma histories can be a complex and difficult task requiring a full evaluation of the clinical picture and an understanding of frequently co-occurring disorders for clients who have experienced trauma. Attendees will learn about mental health disorders prevalent in clients with trauma, skills for accurate yet compassionate assessment, common pitfalls in diagnosis, and essential variables to consider when diagnosing this population. Through use of lecture, case studies, and discussion, attendees will learn to diagnose more precisely and ethically, which will enhance the client’s treatment and lead to better psychotherapeutic outcomes.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program


January 14, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Practicing at the Intersections of Trauma, Identity, and Culture

Instructor: Omkar Sawardekar, MSW, LICSW

How do we practice trauma-informed care while engaging the complexity of our client’s social identities? How do we work effectively across identities while skillfully navigating systems of power and oppression? What is the role of shame in trauma and healing? How do we effectively engage anger, rage, and grief in our clients? What cultural values are at play within ourselves and our clients and how do we attune to and engage these values to create healing relationships? How do we do all of this sustainably?

In this course, we will be exploring the implications of social identity (race, class, gender, gender identity, sexuality, age, etc.) on trauma. Additionally, we will explore the critical need to identify and attune to cultural values present within our clients, our systems, and ourselves. We will examine the use of integrating approaches from fields such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology as a clinical practice/tool that honors the impact of one’s identities and culture on their mental health and trauma. This workshop will introduce participants to specific tools and frameworks through which they can evaluate their own practice and their client relationships, so as to ultimately serve our clients and communities most capably.

Practitioners in this course will:

  • Explore frameworks to conceptualize and navigate the rich and complex intersections of mental health, trauma, social identity, and culture
  • Conceptualize cases through a holistic approach so as to best engage trauma through a social identity and culturally conscious lens
  • Practice clinical trauma-informed care interventions based in mindfulness and embodiment approaches towards sustainable outcomes for clients, providers, and systems

Counts as a Historical Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program


January 16, 2020 - January 17, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Staff Performance and Wellbeing- Strategies for Supervisors and Organizations

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

Participants in this two-day course will learn to identify and monitor indicators and symptoms of secondary traumatic stress conditions and their impact on themselves and those they supervise. Students will learn to recognize important differences among vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout and their implications for job performance. This course will address how to make better-informed decisions about particular strategies to prevent and diminish the effects of secondary stress conditions in specific situations and contexts.

This course will also address issues related to organizational culture and environment and provide meaningful methods for addressing workload and organizational response strategies.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Secondary Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 17, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15a.m.

Facing Shame Together: The Healing Power of the Therapeutic Relationship

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

The very painful experience of shame is highly correlated with client under-utilization of mental health services and early termination of therapy.  Subtle markers of shame may go unrecognized and therefore, unaddressed in the therapeutic relationship.  Addressing shame is hard work and requires practitioner self-awareness, the ability to tolerate painful emotions as well as patience, intensity, and persistence.  This course will provide a working definition of shame and introduce skills for assessing when shame is present and how it may be affecting the change process.  Course participants will have opportunities to learn and practice specific interventions for work with shame including use of the therapeutic relationship to promote healing and change.

Course Objectives:

  • Increase understanding of the origins and experience of shame
  • Learn skills to assess when shame is present and how it may be manifested
  • Describe how shame effects the change process
  • Understand how shame impacts the therapeutic relationship
  • Practice interventions that support containment and healing of shame

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate


March 9, 2020 - March 10, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


March 11, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

The Neurobiology of Supervision (FULL – No Waitlist)

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

The recent explosion of knowledge emerging from brain science has clearly demonstrated that meaningful learning requires integration of multiple domains of functioning. Meaningful, long-lasting learning requires engagement of body, mind and emotion. Although mental health professionals have begun to embrace holistic and integrative methods for practice, use of experiential methods in supervision has been slower to develop. This workshop will demonstrate how experiential methods can be used to enhance individual and group supervision. Participants will have the opportunity to practice and evaluate experiential techniques for supervision in small groups.

Course objectives include:

  • Increase awareness of the basic brain functions that impact the supervisory relationship
  • Learn skills that support supervisees to begin to articulate the affective, cognitive and body based experience of the helping relationship
  • Practice skills for supporting supervisees to accurately label difficult to quantify experiences in their work with individuals, families and groups

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate


March 12, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Apprenticeship in Clinical Supervision: Theoretical Models with a Focus on Reflective Practice (FULL – No Waitlist)

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

*Course previously titled Models of Supervision: Developmental Models for the Supervision of Psychotherapy and Ethical Dimensions- A focus on Reflective Supervision

Clinical supervision is a principal component of learning and growth within the social work profession, ensuring that new professionals are equipped with the insight and skills they need to practice effectively, ethically, and sustainably. Social work relies heavily on skilled supervisors acting as mentors to new professionals, with most learning occurring on the job. Participants will survey theoretical frameworks for clinical supervision, with an emphasis on supervisee development and use of the Reflective Practice framework.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the genesis and development of theoretical models of clinical supervision.
  • Target clinical supervision interventions to the developmental stage of the supervisee through use of the Taibbi Four Stage Model.
  • Learn and apply core components of Reflective Practice Supervision, including how to orient supervisees to the task of clinical supervision through verbal contracting.
  • Effectively address ethical difficulties and clinical challenges presented by supervisees through use of a concrete supervisory framework.

Counts as Elective -or- Ethics Course for Supervision Certificate

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate


March 13, 2020 | 8:45a.m. to 4:15p.m.

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections of Culture and Power (FULL – No Waitlist)

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


2019

August 7-8, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Experiential Interventions for Assessment and Treatment of Traumatized Families: Restoring Balance, Competence, and Hope

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 5 hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 5 hours in assessment based treatment planning, 1 hour in clinical intervention methods, 1 hour in evaluation methods.

A growing body of research is demonstrating the effectiveness of experiential therapies to make definitive and lasting changes in the lives of individuals who have experienced the painful and enduring effects of trauma. When all members of a family system are overwhelmed by trauma, the experience may not only disrupt individual functioning but can also create tenacious patterns of disturbance in “whole” family interactions. Might experiential models and techniques have applicability for work with whole families? If so, how might we effectively integrate experiential techniques with current practice interventions? Drawing from current advances in brain science, trauma theory and family therapy practice, this workshop will introduce a variety of experiential methods that can be utilized to support families in their effort to restore balance, competence, and hope.

Workshop participants will have the opportunity to learn, practice, and discuss experiential techniques for assessment and treatment of traumatized families including:

  • Assessing readiness for family work
  • Creating safety structures
  • Understanding the “neurobiology” of family trauma
  • Prescribing new, restorative roles
  • Engaging with trauma-based defenses
  • Expansion and containment of affect
  • Identifying and working with trauma-based roles
  • Working with “family introjects” and “family projections”
  • Restoring a grounded and coherent family narrative

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Diagnostics Course for Trauma Certificate Program


August 2, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections Of Culture And Power

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


August 1, 2019 – 8:45am to 4:15pm

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and Its Application in Social Work Supervision 

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The supervisory relationship presents some unique challenges and opportunities involving effective use of self. Supervisors are frequently confronted with situations that may evoke strong personal reactions. This course will help participants develop a meaningful and accessible way to conceptualize, apply, and describe the process of “use of self” to themselves and their supervisors.

This course will utilize didactic input and experiential learning, participants will explore how the whole person of the supervisor can be effectively engaged in the way supervision is provided. Strategies for managing obstacles will be introduced, including self-insight, self-integration, empathy, anxiety management, and conceptualizing skills.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisees relationships with clients
  • Learn strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness
  • Learn how the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 31, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

The Neurobiology of Supervision

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The recent explosion of knowledge emerging from brain science has clearly demonstrated that meaningful learning requires integration of multiple domains of functioning. Meaningful, long-lasting learning requires engagement of body, mind and emotion. Although mental health professionals have begun to embrace holistic and integrative methods for practice, use of experiential methods in supervision has been slower to develop. This workshop will demonstrate how experiential methods can be used to enhance individual and group supervision. Participants will have the opportunity to practice and evaluate experiential techniques for supervision in small groups.

Course objectives include:

  • Increase awareness of the basic brain functions that impact the supervisory relationship
  • Learn skills that support supervisees to begin to articulate the affective, cognitive and body based experience of the helping relationship
  • Practice skills for supporting supervisees to accurately label difficult to quantify experiences in their work with individuals, families and groups

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate


July 29-30, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 26, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Healing for the Trauma Organized System: Systemic and Supervisor Interventions

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

Creating Trauma-Informed Organizations requires specific attention to the organizational culture and environment, with interventions on all levels of the organization. The process of moving an organization along the trauma-informed care spectrum can be invigorating and empowering, as well as tedious and time-consuming, and requires champions within the organization who can ensure that as the organization continues to evolve, so do its trauma-informed care practices and policies. The benefits to clients seeking care are numerous, in both experience and outcome. The organization itself can move to a place of health and well-being, increasing staff retention and job satisfaction. Truly trauma-informed organizations have staff throughout the organization, and especially those in leadership, who are able to see the dynamics of trauma-organized systems occurring and feel empowered to intervene for agency safety and stability.

The focus of this course is on the implementation of a trauma-informed care framework within an organization with a focus on the physical environment, the dynamics of trauma-organized systems, and interventions that can be implemented systemically to ensure the health of the organizational culture.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • The components of a Trauma-Informed Organization, including workplace environmental changes needed, and create a plan to advocate for deeper Trauma-Informed Care at their own organization.
  • To identify common dynamics within Trauma-Organized Systems and will increase awareness of incident specific and organizational culture dynamics influenced by client trauma.
  • Intervention strategies for addressing parallel process on all levels of the organization, including agency policy, procedure, supervision, and staff interpersonal dynamics.

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate Program

Counts as Elective course for the Trauma Certificate Program


July 24, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Facing Shame Together: The Healing Power of the Therapeutic Relationship

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours: 1.5 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 1 clock hour in assessment-based clinical treatment planning, 3 clock hours in clinical intervention, .5 clock hour in culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

The very painful experience of shame is highly correlated with client under-utilization of mental health services and early termination of therapy. Subtle markers of shame may go unrecognized and therefore, unaddressed in the therapeutic relationship. Addressing shame is hard work and requires practitioner self-awareness, the ability to tolerate painful emotions as well as patience, intensity, and persistence. This course will provide a working definition of shame and introduce skills for assessing when shame is present and how it may be affecting the change process. Course participants will have opportunities to learn and practice specific interventions for work with shame including use of the therapeutic relationship to promote healing and change.

Course Objectives:

  • Increase understanding of the origins and experience of shame
  • Learn skills to assess when shame is present and how it may be manifested
  • Describe how shame effects the change process
  • Understand how shame impacts the therapeutic relationship
  • Practice interventions that support containment and healing of shame

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 19, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Shhh…Don’t Tell Anyone: Trauma and Domestic Violence

Instructors: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW & Sean Fields, MA 

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock hours – 2 in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 in assessment-based clinical treatment planning, 2 clock hours in clinical intervention methods

Domestic Violence is prevalent in populations seeking mental health services across many service settings, though few practitioners have specialized training in providing services within the dynamics of domestic violence to all members of a family system. With current trends in violence research pointing to the efficacy of trauma-informed interventions, as well as challenges to traditional domestic violence interventions, it is clear that an integrated understanding of DV treatment and the neurobiology of trauma is necessary for efficacious mental health care. This, vitally, includes attending to the physical and psychological safety needs of clients as well as the safe processing of traumatic experiences. Attendees will learn skills for the assessment of domestic violence within a family system, effective intervention strategies which are both trauma-informed and attuned to the unique needs of victim/survivors, perpetrators, and child witnesses. Attendees will also have a better understanding of their role within larger systems including CPS, Probation and family court. Common treatment-interfering misconceptions about domestic violence will be addressed as well as the role of parallel process. Those in attendance will have the opportunity to practice specific skills related to intervening with clients to support their safety needs, trauma processing, increasing somatic awareness, as well as interventions aimed at connecting clients to the larger community.

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 18, 2019 – 8:45AM to 12:00PM

Writing Your Best DA: Staying Ethical, Efficient, and Compliant

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUs; 3 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in social work values and ethics, including cultural context, diversity, and social policy, 1 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment

Writing a Diagnostic Assessment is central to the treatment process and a core component of most clinical social workers’ roles. Despite this, many clinical social workers do not have the opportunity to master this skill, learning primarily on the job with little training or feedback. It is essential that clinical social workers feel that they can engage in this practice in a way that is client-centered, ethical, meets the needs of their agency and third-party payers (especially MN DHS requirements), and is efficient. Diagnostic Assessments live on for clients in their mental health records, court files and outcomes, relationships with service providers, and most importantly affect the ways that they see themselves in the context of their mental health. It is incumbent upon practitioners to ensure that we continue to hone our skills for diagnosis and assessment writing to ensure an ethical process that centers the client’s needs while maintaining compliance with statutory requirements.

Participants in this course will:

  • Learn strategies for client interviews to aid in efficient writing of diagnostic assessments, with a focus on interviewing to assess safely for trauma history.
  • Review MN DHS statutory requirements for writing a Diagnostic Assessment, with special focus on cultural influences.
  • Practice with comprehensive clinical summaries, written to statute, which integrate data obtained in the interview with their clinical justification for the chosen diagnosis and assessment of client needs and referrals.

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 16-17, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Sensorimotor Approaches for Trauma Symptoms in Adults: Applications for Multiple Practice Settings

Instructor: Martha Osterberg, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, including normative development and psychopathology across the life span, 1 clock hour in assessment-based clinical treatment planning with measureable goals, 9 clock hours in clinical intervention methods informed by research and current standards practice

A traumatic experience overpowers the body’s ability to defend itself. Survivors of trauma become less present in their bodies to avoid the somatic memory of vulnerability. Traumatic violations within relationships profoundly affect trust, safety and personal power. This course will draw from advancements in the neuroscience of trauma with a focus on applying this information to your daily practice with clients.

Building on a solid foundation of theory, participants will practice many practical techniques that can be used in a variety of practice settings to help clients become more present, grounded and regulated. Participants will learn specific interventions to assist clients in defending their boundaries and connecting safely. Participants will also practice ways to stay present and embodied themselves. This course will emphasize experiential learning throughout the two days.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 12, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

The Intersection of Trauma and Substance Abuse

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 in assessment-based treatment planning, 2 in clinical intervention methods

Instructor: Jillian Wright-Martin, MPS, LADC & Julie Rohovit, PhD

The experience of trauma is quite common across the human lifespan with some survivors going on to develop maladaptive coping strategies, including use of commonly abused substances like alcohol and other drugs, as well as psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Trauma survivors are also at increased risk for a wide array of other physical and interpersonal challenges, which can exacerbate problems associated with substance use. Use of alcohol and other drugs can also increase the likelihood a person will experience a traumatic event. While research has dramatically changed our understanding of how the experience of trauma can affect development and wellness across the lifespan, many health care professionals receive little or no training on assessing for a trauma history and/or substance use or what they might recommend/offer as treatment options.

This course will provide:

  • Working definitions of trauma across the lifespan and its intersection with commonly abused substances;
  • Practical considerations in engaging with and assessing a person who has a history of trauma and problematic substance use;
  • Discussion of evidence-based and promising practices in treating trauma and substance use disorders in an integrated fashion.

Counts as Substance Abuse course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 11, 2019 – 8:45AM to 12:00PM

Contracted Clinical Supervision: Navigating the Balance of Transparency, Support, and Accountability

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUs

The relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee is key to the effectiveness of the supervisory relationship. An important feature of the supervisory process is the creation and formation of the contract for supervision. This document represents the ways in which this relationship will function, the ways in which challenges will be addressed, and the boundaries of the roles and responsibilities.

This course will help new and experienced supervisors alike to consider the contract for supervision as a tool in the relational act of supervision, to create an effective template for a contract for supervision, and to discuss issues and challenges related to contract creation.

Participants are encouraged to bring with them a contract they have used in the past.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 10, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Practicing at the Intersections of Trauma, Identity, and Culture

Instructor: Omkar Sawardekar, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in clinical intervention methods informed by research and current standards of practice, 2 hours in social work values and ethics, including cultural context, diversity, and social policy, 2 hours in culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

How do we practice trauma-informed care while engaging the complexity of our client’s social identities? How do we work effectively across identities while skillfully navigating systems of power and oppression? What is the role of shame in trauma and healing? How do we effectively engage anger, rage, and grief in our clients? What cultural values are at play within ourselves and our clients and how do we attune to and engage these values to create healing relationships? How do we do all of this sustainably?

In this course, we will be exploring the implications of social identity (race, class, gender, gender identity, sexuality, age, etc.) on trauma. Additionally, we will explore the critical need to identify and attune to cultural values present within our clients, our systems, and ourselves. We will examine the use of integrating approaches from fields such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology as a clinical practice/tool that honors the impact of one’s identities and culture on their mental health and trauma. This workshop will introduce participants to specific tools and frameworks through which they can evaluate their own practice and their client relationships, so as to ultimately serve our clients and communities most capably.

Practitioners in this course will:

  • Explore frameworks to conceptualize and navigate the rich and complex intersections of mental health, trauma, social identity, and culture
  • Conceptualize cases through a holistic approach so as to best engage trauma through a social identity and culturally conscious lens
  • Practice clinical trauma-informed care interventions based in mindfulness and embodiment approaches towards sustainable outcomes for clients, providers, and systems

Counts as a Historical Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 10, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Affective Neuroscience: The Motivating Role of Emotion for Healing and Change

Instructor: Judy Hoy, LICSW, DSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 1 hour in differential diagnosis, 1 hour in assessment based treatment planning, 2 hours in clinical intervention methods, .5 hour in evaluation methodologies, 1 hour in social work values and ethics, .5 in culturally specific clinical assessment

Affective neuroscience is a specialized area of study focused on the brain mechanisms and processes of emotion. Affective neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that combines neurobiology with the study of personality, emotion and mood. Rather than reducing human emotion to a simple biological equation, affective neuroscience validates the centrality of subjective experience in the process of healing and change. This experiential workshop will introduce basic concepts from affective neuroscience that offer new insights into the work we do with individuals, families and groups. Participants will learn and practice interventions that support clients to: a. safely experience, b. reflect on, c. modulate, d. make meaning of and, d. use emotions in service of meaningful and enduring change.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Develop a basic understanding of affective neuroscience and its relevance for clinical practice
  • Understand how emotions drive learning and motivate change
  • Increase awareness of one’s own attitudes about expression of emotion and how it impacts practice behavior
  • Learn how to use awareness of one’s own emotional responses to create empathic attunement with clients
  • Understand the difference between compartmentalizationof affect and containment of affect
  • Learn and practice skills that help clients learn how to safely experience, reflect on and make meaning of their emotional experiences

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 8-9, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Staff Performance and Wellbeing- Strategies for Supervisors and Organizations

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 3 assessment based treatment and planning, 3 clinical intervention methods, 4 ethics, 2 culturally specific clinical assessment and treatment

Participants in this two-day course will learn to identify and monitor indicators and symptoms of secondary traumatic stress conditions and their impact on themselves and those they supervise. Students will learn to recognize important differences among vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout and their implications for job performance. This course will address how to make better-informed decisions about particular strategies to prevent and diminish the effects of secondary stress conditions in specific situations and contexts

This course will also address issues related to organizational culture and environment and provide meaningful methods for addressing workload and organizational response strategies.

Students are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Secondary Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


June 28, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections Of Culture And Power

Instructor: Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


June 27, 2019 – 8:45am to 4:15pm

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and Its Application in Social Work Supervision 

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The supervisory relationship presents some unique challenges and opportunities involving effective use of self. Supervisors are frequently confronted with situations that may evoke strong personal reactions. This course will help participants develop a meaningful and accessible way to conceptualize, apply, and describe the process of “use of self” to themselves and their supervisors.

This course will utilize didactic input and experiential learning, participants will explore how the whole person of the supervisor can be effectively engaged in the way supervision is provided. Strategies for managing obstacles will be introduced, including self-insight, self-integration, empathy, anxiety management, and conceptualizing skills.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisees relationships with clients
  • Learn strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness
  • Learn how the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


June 26, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Leading and Facilitating Staff Groups

Instructor: Xavier Schmitz, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

Supervisors spend a great of time working with a variety of formal and informal staff groups. Many important leadership opportunities—to resolve problems, strengthen team cohesion, or evolve a new collective vision of the work in the face of daunting obstacles—are frequently missed, or fumbled, in meetings of staff groups that supervisors lead or facilitate. Confusion often surrounds important differences in purpose among staff meetings, case consultation groups, group supervision, and in-service training. Many times supervisors feel unprepared to address the challenging interpersonal group dynamics, or the authority and intimacy issues that invariably surface in groups. Come prepared to blend your heart’s intuition with your head’s wisdom as you hone your skills to create an accessible, integrative approach to supervision.

Counts as an alternative course for Keys to Managing Conflict and Agreement in Staff Groups for Supervision Certificate Program


June 24-25, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


June 20-21, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

DSM-5 Psychopathology Review

Instructor: Katrina Cisneros, MSSW., LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours: 7 clock hours of differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 3 clock hours of evaluation methodologies, 2 clock hours of culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

This course will serve as a comprehensive review of the DSM-5 diagnostic system. Participants may find this course helpful for preparation for the LICSW examination as it will provide a significant psychopathology overview. Video, case studies, and small group exercises will be used to increase learning.

Counts as DSM-5 course for Trauma Certificate Program


June 19, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Ethics and Supervision: Utilizing a Decision-Making Model To Navigate Through Rough Waters

Instructors: Linda Jones, PhD, MSSW, LISW & Mary Carlsen, MSW, LISW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

This course will examine the ethical obligations of supervisors and present research about common ethical violations among supervisees in social work and related professions. The presenters will provide a comprehensive model to guide the analysis of and response to ethical dilemmas and apply it to supervisory case examples from various areas of social work practice. Up-to-date information about the types of ethics complaints and the adjudication processes of the Minnesota Board of Social Work and the National Association of Social Workers will be presented. Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to discern common ethical dilemmas faced in their practice as supervisors and ample time to present elaborated case examples from their supervisory practice, submitted prior to the course, for discussion and consultation. The presenters will provide additional case examples for discussion among workshop participants.

Counts as Ethics course for Supervision Certificate Program


June 18, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Resistance to Assistance: How to Avoid Pathologizing “Resistance” and Build Trust

Instructor: Martha Osterberg, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, including normative development and psychopathology across the life span, 3 clock hours in clinical intervention methods, 1 clock hour in culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

Why does it feel like some clients resist our best intentions to assist them?

This course seeks to answer that question. It is a given that both client and practitioner have been wounded in previous relationships, and both will become activated when these wounds are touched. When clients resist our efforts, we may react in a variety of ways.

The course is based on the premise that much of what we now call “mental disorder” is a consequence of intergenerational trauma or absence of attachment, and that many present day “symptoms” started as coping mechanisms.

We will begin by clarifying basic human needs to both connect and to protect ourselves in any relationship. The protection may be against invasion of our boundaries and/or against abandonment, rejection or judgment. We will then identify the double bind that occurred when connection and protection were pitted against one another.  We will discern how the double bind gets repeated within the present relationship. By making explicit what already implicitly governs the relationship of practitioner and client, we can find ways to empathize and build a foundation of trust and collaboration.

Counts as Elective Course for Trauma Certificate Program


June 17, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

In the Space Between: Contemporary Relational Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Complex Trauma

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW & Amirthini Keefe MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 1 hour in assessment-based clinical treatment planning with measurable goals, 4.5 hours in clinical intervention methods informed by research and current standards of practice, .5 clock hour in social work values and ethics, including cultural context, diversity, and social policy

Common Factors research shows clearly the centrality of the relationship for good outcomes in psychotherapy, including a reduction in symptoms and increase in functioning for those affected by mental illness. The space between practitioner and client is vital for healing from experiences of complex trauma, as the fear and violence were typically committed in relationship. Attending to the attachment relationship and providing a holding environment allows clients to rework early disruptions in attachment patterns due to experiences of trauma. This workshop will use contemporary relational psychodynamic theory to explicate a model for treating complex trauma through an empathic, client-centered, and intersubjective relational lens. Integration of anti-oppressive practice theory and trauma-informed care principles will be woven throughout. Attention will also be paid to the needs of the practitioner in managing the intensity of transference and countertransference in the treatment of trauma. Participants will leave the training with a comprehensive understanding of contemporary relational theory for the treatment of complexly traumatized populations.

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate Program


June 14, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Contemporary Intervention Approaches to Grief and Loss

Instructor: Stacy Remke, MSW, LICSW, ACHP-SW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in differential diagnosis & biopsysoc assessment, 1 hour in assessment-based clinical treatment plan, 2 hours in clinical intervention methods, 1 hour in culturally specific clinical assessment & intervention

Grief is a complex and inevitable part of life for human beings and yet there are many misconceptions about the nature of grief and how best to cope with this natural healing process. This course will review contemporary theories and intervention approaches recommended to address typical, complex and diverse types of grief. The current DSM-V treatment for grief and complicated grief will also be discussed.

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


March 19, 2019 – 1:00PM to 4:15PM

Writing Your Best DA: Staying Ethical, Efficient, and Compliant

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUs; 3 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in social work values and ethics, including cultural context, diversity, and social policy, 1 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment

Writing a Diagnostic Assessment is central to the treatment process and a core component of most clinical social workers’ roles. Despite this, many clinical social workers do not have the opportunity to master this skill, learning primarily on the job with little training or feedback. It is essential that clinical social workers feel that they can engage in this practice in a way that is client-centered, ethical, meets the needs of their agency and third-party payers (especially MN DHS requirements), and is efficient. Diagnostic Assessments live on for clients in their mental health records, court files and outcomes, relationships with service providers, and most importantly affect the ways that they see themselves in the context of their mental health. It is incumbent upon practitioners to ensure that we continue to hone our skills for diagnosis and assessment writing to ensure an ethical process that centers the client’s needs while maintaining compliance with statutory requirements.

Participants in this course will:

  • Learn strategies for client interviews to aid in efficient writing of diagnostic assessments, with a focus on interviewing to assess safely for trauma history.
  • Review MN DHS statutory requirements for writing a Diagnostic Assessment, with special focus on cultural influences.
  • Practice with comprehensive clinical summaries, written to statute, which integrate data obtained in the interview with their clinical justification for the chosen diagnosis and assessment of client needs and referrals.

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


March 19, 2019 – 9:00AM to 12:15PM

Differential Diagnosis in Trauma: DSM-5 Diagnosis for Traumatized Clients

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUS; 3 Clinical Clock Hours – 1 hour in differential dx and biopsychosocial assessment, 1 hour in assessment-based treatment planning, 1 hour in clinical intervention methods

Differential diagnosis for clients presenting with trauma histories can be a complex and difficult task requiring a full evaluation of the clinical picture and an understanding of frequently co-occurring disorders for clients who have experienced trauma. Attendees will learn about mental health disorders prevalent in clients with trauma, skills for accurate yet compassionate assessment, common pitfalls in diagnosis, and essential variables to consider when diagnosing this population. Through use of lecture, case studies, and discussion, attendees will learn to diagnose more precisely and ethically, which will enhance the client’s treatment and lead to better psychotherapeutic outcomes.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program


March 18, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Leaning into Darkness: Essential Concepts in the Provision of Trauma Informed Care

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in differential dx and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 hours in assessment-based treatment planning, 2 hours in clinical intervention methods

The effective treatment of trauma requires not only an understanding of the basics of trauma, but also its effects on the human mind, body, and soul. Trauma informed care requires an ability to recognize the effects of traumatic experiences on clients and the prevalence of those effects in individuals seeking medical and mental health care. A thorough understanding of the constellation of symptoms and mental health presentations of traumatized clients as well as the neurobiology of trauma will be addressed. Participants will learn to support clients who have difficulty making clinical gains due to inability to regulate emotionally or physiologically as a result of their traumatic experiences, and to apply proactive strategies for provision of care which are attuned to the complex needs of traumatized clients. The basics of successful engagement, assessment, intervention, and termination during treatment for trauma will be addressed, as well as specific variables for workers to attend to in order increase retention of traumatized clients in treatment. A variety of populations will be discussed, from young children to adults, as well as a range of presentations including both simple and complex trauma. Participants will receive 1.5 hours of CEUs via online course content prior to this class.  During class, participants will have an opportunity to practice some useful intervention techniques to aid in client regulation during sessions.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program


January 17-18, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

DSM-5 Psychopathology Review

Instructor: Katrina Cisneros, MSSW., LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours: 7 clock hours of differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 3 clock hours of evaluation methodologies, 2 clock hours of culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

This course will serve as a comprehensive review of the DSM-5 diagnostic system. Participants may find this course helpful for preparation for the LICSW examination as it will provide a significant psychopathology overview. Video, case studies, and small group exercises will be used to increase learning.

Counts as DSM-5 course for Trauma Certificate Program


January 15, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Relational Responsibility and Ethic of Care: Considerations for Responsive and Just Practice

Instructor: Julie Tilsen, PhD, MA, LP

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The ethic of relational responsibility is an orientation to relational and therapeutic processes that requires us to attend to local, historical, and cultural considerations rather than universal principles. The focus is on conversational processes, not on people, situations, or problems in isolation.  This frees ethics from the file cabinet of “dilemmas” and places it in the center of our daily practice. We will examine the nuances of working in the varied contexts in which today’s practitioners find themselves. We will explore ways to ground ourselves in a relational ethic of care that gives our work meaning, helps sustain us in our practice, and allows us to engage in justice as an ethical endeavor. We will consider the question, “How do we know when clinical practice is responsible and ethical?” from multiple perspectives, and offer conversational resources for ethical action in practice.

We will consider:

  • Ways in which a relational ethic is not the ethic of “no ethic” but of the continuous construction of meaning
  • How the movement from a position of value neutrality to awareness of value construction enhances relational responsiveness
  • An understanding of ethics beyond the analysis of actions produced by self-contained individuals toward a focus on the collaborative construction of what is good and what is real
  • How the ways we understand and “do” our ethics contribute to our identities and can sustain us when working in challenging contexts
  • How engaging in relational ethics serve as a core component of socially just and culturally responsive practice

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how relational responsibility and ethic of care provide a therapeutic stance for justice-doing in practice.
  2. Participants will learn conversational practices for centering ethics in their practice.
  3. Participants will consider and articulate their relational ethic of care that guides their practice.

Counts as an Ethics course for Supervision Certificate Program

Counts as an Elective course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 14-15, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Staff Performance and Wellbeing- Strategies for Supervisors and Organizations

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 3 assessment based treatment and planning, 3 clinical intervention methods, 4 ethics, 2 culturally specific clinical assessment and treatment

Participants in this two-day course will learn to identify and monitor indicators and symptoms of secondary traumatic stress conditions and their impact on themselves and those they supervise. Students will learn to recognize important differences among vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout and their implications for job performance. This course will address how to make better-informed decisions about particular strategies to prevent and diminish the effects of secondary stress conditions in specific situations and contexts

This course will also address issues related to organizational culture and environment and provide meaningful methods for addressing workload and organizational response strategies.

Students are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Secondary Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 11, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections Of Culture And Power

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


January 10, 2019 – 8:45am to 4:15pm

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and Its Application in Social Work Supervision 

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The supervisory relationship presents some unique challenges and opportunities involving effective use of self. Supervisors are frequently confronted with situations that may evoke strong personal reactions. This course will help participants develop a meaningful and accessible way to conceptualize, apply, and describe the process of “use of self” to themselves and their supervisors.

This course will utilize didactic input and experiential learning, participants will explore how the whole person of the supervisor can be effectively engaged in the way supervision is provided. Strategies for managing obstacles will be introduced, including self-insight, self-integration, empathy, anxiety management, and conceptualizing skills.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisees relationships with clients
  • Learn strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness
  • Learn how the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


January 9, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

The Neurobiology of Supervision

Instructor: Judy Hoy, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The recent explosion of knowledge emerging from brain science has clearly demonstrated that meaningful learning requires integration of multiple domains of functioning. Meaningful, long-lasting learning requires engagement of body, mind and emotion. Although mental health professionals have begun to embrace holistic and integrative methods for practice, use of experiential methods in supervision has been slower to develop. This workshop will demonstrate how experiential methods can be used to enhance individual and group supervision. Participants will have the opportunity to practice and evaluate experiential techniques for supervision in small groups.

Course objectives include:

  • Increase awareness of the basic brain functions that impact the supervisory relationship
  • Learn skills that support supervisees to begin to articulate the affective, cognitive and body based experience of the helping relationship
  • Practice skills for supporting supervisees to accurately label difficult to quantify experiences in their work with individuals, families and groups

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate


January 7-8, 2019 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


2018

August 13, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Beyond Fun and Games: Using Play Therapy to Treat Trauma in Children 4-12 Years

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in assessment-based treatment planning, 4 hours in clinical intervention methods

Integration of trauma-informed care into work with children who have witnessed or experienced violence requires a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of violence and the neurobiology of trauma within a developmental and attachment framework. By discussing the effects of trauma on children, principles of trauma-informed treatment for children, and Child Centered Play Therapy as an efficacious intervention for traumatized populations, participants will learn specific skills for trauma-informed play therapy interventions with youth who present with a variety of mental health symptoms. Attendees will learn about the use of non-directive play therapy for trauma processing with youth and will understand core principles of trauma-informed care when working with a child and their family. Opportunity for hands-on practice will be incorporated.

Counts as Treatment course for Trauma Certificate Program*

Learn more about Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

Course previously titled Using Play Therapy to Treat Trauma in Children 4-12 Years


August 10, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Beyond 101-Negotiating and Utilizing ‘Self’ in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections Of Culture And Power

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

This course is designed to help practitioners understand the cultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship. We will explore research that illuminates the need to better understand the potential challenges and opportunities resulting from cross-cultural supervisory practice.

Learning objectives for this course include:

  • Learn about and from other participants in terms of identity development and how this informs their work
  • Receive theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate


August 9, 2018 – 8:45am to 4:15pm

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and Its Application in Social Work Supervision 

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The supervisory relationship presents some unique challenges and opportunities involving effective use of self. Supervisors are frequently confronted with situations that may evoke strong personal reactions. This course will help participants develop a meaningful and accessible way to conceptualize, apply, and describe the process of “use of self” to themselves and their supervisors.

This course will utilize didactic input and experiential learning, participants will explore how the whole person of the supervisor can be effectively engaged in the way supervision is provided. Strategies for managing obstacles will be introduced, including self-insight, self-integration, empathy, anxiety management, and conceptualizing skills.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisees relationships with clients
  • Learn strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness
  • Learn how the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


August 8, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Leading and Facilitating Staff Groups

Instructor: Dan Porter, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

Supervisors spend a great of time working with a variety of formal and informal staff groups. Many important leadership opportunities—to resolve problems, strengthen team cohesion, or evolve a new collective vision of the work in the face of daunting obstacles—are frequently missed, or fumbled, in meetings of staff groups that supervisors lead or facilitate. Confusion often surrounds important differences in purpose among staff meetings, case consultation groups, group supervision, and in-service trainings. Many times supervisors feel unprepared to address the challenging interpersonal group dynamics, or the authority and intimacy issues that invariably surface in groups.

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate Program


August 6-7, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Core Competencies in Social Work Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs

The supervisory relationship offers an extraordinary opportunity to influence the performance and job satisfaction of staff. Because supervisors are often expected to mediate the pressures associated with over-burdened staff, resource constraints, escalating client need, and a volatile policy climate, effective preparation for this role can make a world of difference. To be effective, supervisors must develop skills to manage complexity, think systematically and behave relationally.

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying competencies essential for effective supervision.

Learners are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


August 3, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Healing for the Trauma Organized System: Systemic and Supervisor Interventions

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

Creating Trauma-Informed Organizations requires specific attention to the organizational culture and environment, with interventions on all levels of the organization. The process of moving an organization along the trauma-informed care spectrum can be invigorating and empowering, as well as tedious and time-consuming, and requires champions within the organization who can ensure that as the organization continues to evolve, so do its trauma-informed care practices and policies. The benefits to clients seeking care are numerous, in both experience and outcome. The organization itself can move to a place of health and well-being, increasing staff retention and job satisfaction. Truly trauma-informed organizations have staff throughout the organization, and especially those in leadership, who are able to see the dynamics of trauma-organized systems occurring and feel empowered to intervene for agency safety and stability.

The focus of this course is on the implementation of a trauma-informed care framework within an organization with a focus on the physical environment, the dynamics of trauma-organized systems, and interventions that can be implemented systemically to ensure the health of the organizational culture.

Participants in this course will learn:

  • The components of a Trauma-Informed Organization, including workplace environmental changes needed, and create a plan to advocate for deeper Trauma-Informed Care at their own organization.
  • To identify common dynamics within Trauma-Organized Systems and will increase awareness of incident specific and organizational culture dynamics influenced by client trauma.
  • Intervention strategies for addressing parallel process on all levels of the organization, including agency policy, procedure, supervision, and staff interpersonal dynamics.

Counts as Elective course for Supervision Certificate Program


August 2, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Leaning into Darkness: Essential Concepts in the Provision of Trauma Informed Care

Instructor: Angela Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in differential dx and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 hours in assessment-based treatment planning, 2 hours in clinical intervention methods

The effective treatment of trauma requires not only an understanding of the basics of trauma, but also its effects on the human mind, body, and soul. Trauma informed care requires an ability to recognize the effects of traumatic experiences on clients and the prevalence of those effects in individuals seeking medical and mental health care. A thorough understanding of the constellation of symptoms and mental health presentations of traumatized clients as well as the neurobiology of trauma will be addressed. Participants will learn to support clients who have difficulty making clinical gains due to inability to regulate emotionally or physiologically as a result of their traumatic experiences, and to apply proactive strategies for provision of care which are attuned to the complex needs of traumatized clients. The basics of successful engagement, assessment, intervention, and termination during treatment for trauma will be addressed, as well as specific variables for workers to attend to in order increase retention of traumatized clients in treatment. A variety of populations will be discussed, from young children to adults, as well as a range of presentations including both simple and complex trauma. Participants will receive 1.5 hours of CEUs via online course content prior to this class.  During class, participants will have an opportunity to practice some useful intervention techniques to aid in client regulation during sessions.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program


August 1, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Zero to Three: Treating Trauma in Early Childhood

Instructor:  Lauren Nietz, MSW, LICSW and Jesse Kuendig, MA, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours: 4 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, including normative development and psychopathology across the life span, 2 clock hour in assessment-based clinical treatment planning with measurable goals

Oftentimes adults believe infants and children are too young to remember traumatic events but a growing body of research suggests young people, from birth to age 5, are profoundly affected by domestic violence, sexual abuse, war, and the loss of a caregiver. Reactions in this age group may differ from older children because they cannot verbalize how they feel yet they can be profoundly impacted even if they do not understand the events. Learn the behavioral and physiological symptoms of early childhood trauma as well as the unique risks associated with this age group including brain development and the threat to the caregiving relationship. Community resources, support for the caregiver, and treatment methods will be discussed.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program*

*Course previously titled Trauma in Early Childhood


July 31, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Relational Responsibility and Ethic of Care: Considerations for Responsive and Just Practice

Instructor: Julie Tilsen, PhD, MA, LP

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

The ethic of relational responsibility is an orientation to relational and therapeutic processes that requires us to attend to local, historical, and cultural considerations rather than universal principles. The focus is on conversational processes, not on people, situations, or problems in isolation.  This frees ethics from the file cabinet of “dilemmas” and places it in the center of our daily practice. We will examine the nuances of working in the varied contexts in which today’s practitioners find themselves. We will explore ways to ground ourselves in a relational ethic of care that gives our work meaning, helps sustain us in our practice, and allows us to engage in justice as an ethical endeavor. We will consider the question, “How do we know when clinical practice is responsible and ethical?” from multiple perspectives, and offer conversational resources for ethical action in practice.

We will consider:

  • Ways in which a relational ethic is not the ethic of “no ethic” but of the continuous construction of meaning
  • How the movement from a position of value neutrality to awareness of value construction enhances relational responsiveness
  • An understanding of ethics beyond the analysis of actions produced by self-contained individuals toward a focus on the collaborative construction of what is good and what is real
  • How the ways we understand and “do” our ethics contribute to our identities and can sustain us when working in challenging contexts
  • How engaging in relational ethics serve as a core component of socially just and culturally responsive practice

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how relational responsibility and ethic of care provide a therapeutic stance for justice-doing in practice.
  2. Participants will learn conversational practices for centering ethics in their practice.
  3. Participants will consider and articulate their relational ethic of care that guides their practice.

Counts as an Ethics course for Supervision Certificate Program

Counts as an Elective course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 30, 2018 – 1:00PM to 4:15PM

Writing Your Best DA: Staying Ethical, Efficient, and Compliant

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUs; 3 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in social work values and ethics, including cultural context, diversity, and social policy, 1 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment

Writing a Diagnostic Assessment is central to the treatment process and a core component of most clinical social workers’ roles. Despite this, many clinical social workers do not have the opportunity to master this skill, learning primarily on the job with little training or feedback. It is essential that clinical social workers feel that they can engage in this practice in a way that is client-centered, ethical, meets the needs of their agency and third-party payers (especially MN DHS requirements), and is efficient. Diagnostic Assessments live on for clients in their mental health records, court files and outcomes, relationships with service providers, and most importantly affect the ways that they see themselves in the context of their mental health. It is incumbent upon practitioners to ensure that we continue to hone our skills for diagnosis and assessment writing to ensure an ethical process that centers the client’s needs while maintaining compliance with statutory requirements.

Participants in this course will:

  • Learn strategies for client interviews to aid in efficient writing of diagnostic assessments, with a focus on interviewing to assess safely for trauma history.
  • Review MN DHS statutory requirements for writing a Diagnostic Assessment, with special focus on cultural influences.
  • Practice with comprehensive clinical summaries, written to statute, which integrate data obtained in the interview with their clinical justification for the chosen diagnosis and assessment of client needs and referrals.

Counts as Elective course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 30, 2018 – 9:00AM to 12:15PM

Differential Diagnosis in Trauma: DSM-5 Diagnosis for Traumatized Clients

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUS; 3 Clinical Clock Hours – 1 hour in differential dx and biopsychosocial assessment, 1 hour in assessment-based treatment planning, 1 hour in clinical intervention methods

Differential diagnosis for clients presenting with trauma histories can be a complex and difficult task requiring a full evaluation of the clinical picture and an understanding of frequently co-occurring disorders for clients who have experienced trauma. Attendees will learn about mental health disorders prevalent in clients with trauma, skills for accurate yet compassionate assessment, common pitfalls in diagnosis, and essential variables to consider when diagnosing this population. Through use of lecture, case studies, and discussion, attendees will learn to diagnose more precisely and ethically, which will enhance the client’s treatment and lead to better psychotherapeutic outcomes.

Counts as Diagnostics course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 26-27, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Staff Performance and Wellbeing- Strategies for Supervisors and Organizations

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dmello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 3 assessment based treatment and planning, 3 clinical intervention methods, 4 ethics, 2 culturally specific clinical assessment and treatment

Participants in this two-day course will learn to identify and monitor indicators and symptoms of secondary traumatic stress conditions and their impact on themselves and those they supervise. Students will learn to recognize important differences among vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout and their implications for job performance. This course will address how to make better-informed decisions about particular strategies to prevent and diminish the effects of secondary stress conditions in specific situations and contexts

This course will also address issues related to organizational culture and environment and provide meaningful methods for addressing workload and organizational response strategies.

Students are required to register for both days of this course.

Counts as Secondary Trauma course for Trauma Certificate Program

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 20, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Apprenticeship in Clinical Supervision: Theoretical Models with a Focus on Reflective Practice

Instructor: Angela Lewis Dimello, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs

Clinical supervision is a principal component of learning and growth within the social work profession, ensuring that new professionals are equipped with the insight and skills they need to practice effectively, ethically, and sustainably. Social work relies heavily on skilled supervisors acting as mentors to new professionals, with most learning occurring on the job. Participants will survey theoretical frameworks for clinical supervision, with an emphasis on supervisee development and use of the Reflective Practice framework.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the genesis and development of theoretical models of clinical supervision.
  • Target clinical supervision interventions to the developmental stage of the supervisee through use of the Taibbi Four Stage Model.
  • Learn and apply core components of Reflective Practice Supervision, including how to orient supervisees to the task of clinical supervision through verbal contracting.
  • Effectively address ethical difficulties and clinical challenges presented by supervisees through use of a concrete supervisory framework.

*Course previously titled Models of Supervision: Developmental Models for the Supervision of Psychotherapy and Ethical Dimensions- A focus on Reflective Supervision

Counts as Elective -or- Ethics Course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 18-19, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Group Interventions for Treatment of Trauma in Adults

Instructor: Judy Hoy, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 hours in assessment-based clinical treatment planning, 5 hours in clinical intervention methods informed by research and current standards of practice, 1 hour in evaluation methodologies, 1 hour in social work values and ethics, and 1 hour in culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

For some trauma survivors, group therapy can offer a powerful method for healing. When trauma survivors begin to talk about their experiences with other survivors, it can help reduce feelings of fear, shame, and isolation. The group experience can also trigger trauma symptoms including dissociation, re-experiencing, and hypervigilance. How then, do group facilitators find the critical balance between a survivor’s need to safely address emotional pain and a survivor’s need for containment of emotions that can overwhelm and compromise healing? Can group dynamics be used to teach and support this balance? This two-day workshop will introduce participants to a broad range of interventions for use in group treatment of trauma. Day 1 will provide an overview of diagnosis, assessment and treatment of trauma and a review of group theory, concepts and methods. Participants will learn and practice interventions for use in early stages of group development including: creating safety, establishing trauma sensitive group norms, identification of personal and interpersonal strengths and facilitation of group member interactions. On Day 2 participants will learn and practice interventions for use in the working and end stages of group development including: experiential role training, conflict management, managing defenses, communication of feelings and needs, and effective group closure activities.

Participants who attend this workshop will:

  • Learn and review therapeutic group theories, concepts, and methods
  • Increase knowledge of post-traumatic stress disorder, its diagnoses and treatment
  • Assess the effectiveness of group work with diverse populations
  • Increase awareness of the strengths and limitations of group therapy for trauma survivors
  • Gain knowledge about the neurobiological impact of trauma
  • Learn and practice group interventions that safely engage emotions
  • Learn and practice group interventions for effective containment of trauma symptoms
  • Develop skills for assessing and utilizing group dynamics in the treatment of trauma

Counts as Treatment Course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 18, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

The Intersection of Trauma and Substance Abuse

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 in differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 2 in assessment-based treatment planning, 2 in clinical intervention methods

Instructor: Jillian Wright-Martin, MPS, LADC & Julie Rohovit, PhD

The experience of trauma is quite common across the human lifespan with some survivors going on to develop maladaptive coping strategies, including use of commonly abused substances like alcohol and other drugs, as well as psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Trauma survivors are also at increased risk for a wide array of other physical and interpersonal challenges, which can exacerbate problems associated with substance use. Use of alcohol and other drugs can also increase the likelihood a person will experience a traumatic event. While research has dramatically changed our understanding of how the experience of trauma can affect development and wellness across the lifespan, many health care professionals receive little or no training on assessing for a trauma history and/or substance use or what they might recommend/offer as treatment options.

This course will provide:

  • Working definitions of trauma across the lifespan and its intersection with commonly abused substances;
  • Practical considerations in engaging with and assessing a person who has a history of trauma and problematic substance use;
  • Discussion of evidence-based and promising practices in treating trauma and substance use disorders in an integrated fashion.

Counts as Substance Abuse course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 17, 2018 – 9:00AM to 12:15PM

Contracted Clinical Supervision: Navigating the Balance of Transparency, Support, and Accountability

Instructor: Christina Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 3 CEUs

The relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee is key to the effectiveness of the supervisory relationship. An important feature of the supervisory process is the creation and formation of the contract for supervision. This document represents the ways in which this relationship will function, the ways in which challenges will be addressed, and the boundaries of the roles and responsibilities.

This course will help new and experienced supervisors alike to consider the contract for supervision as a tool in the relational act of supervision, to create an effective template for a contract for supervision, and to discuss issues and challenges related to contract creation.

Participants are encouraged to bring with them a contract they have used in the past.

Counts as Required course for Supervision Certificate Program


July 16-17, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

DSM-5 Psychopathology Review

Instructor: Katrina Cisneros, MSSW., LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 12 CEUs; 12 Clinical Clock Hours: 7 clock hours of differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial assessment, 3 clock hours of evaluation methodologies, 2 clock hours of culturally specific clinical assessment and intervention

This course will serve as a comprehensive review of the DSM-5 diagnostic system. Participants may find this course helpful for preparation for the LICSW examination as it will provide a significant psychopathology overview. Video, case studies, and small group exercises will be used to increase learning.

Counts as DSM-5 course for Trauma Certificate Program


July 16, 2018 – 8:45AM to 4:15PM

Resistance to Assistance: How to Avoid Pathologizing “Resistance” and Build Trust

Instructor: Martha Osterberg, MSW, LICSW

CEU and/or Clinical Clock Hours: 6 CEUs; 6 Clinical Clock Hours – 2 clock hours in differential diagnosis and biopsychosoci